Tag: Technology

Why China Has a Love-Hate Relationship with Cryptocurrency

China has a love-hate relationship with crypto. It loves the technology but hates the illicit activity. While blockchain will play a vital role as a strategic technology highlighted in national development goals, its ties to cryptocurrency challenge industry development. This has led to harsher regulation of the cryptocurrency space in the hopes that, by separating cryptocurrency and blockchain technology, policymakers can hasten the maturity of the blockchain industry without fear of the social or financial instability associated with crypto.

China’s Digital Yuan Paves the Way for Global CBDCs

Central Bank Digital Currencies (“CBDCs”) could well be one of the most profound developments of the 21st century. This article takes a look at the impact, motivations, and policy choices available to Central Banks and contrasts them with how China’s PBOC is proceeding.

Chinese Universities Chip In To Narrow Semiconductor Talent Gap

Semiconductor chips are at the crux of the US-China technology competition, and export controls from the ongoing trade war have impeded China’s semiconductor ambitions. Among other measures, China has been establishing integrated circuit schools, microelectronic colleges, and related programs to train qualified candidates for the semiconductor industry, all of which are backed by national domestic policy efforts. However, the efficacy of these initiatives to meaningfully contribute to China’s long-term self-sufficiency efforts is yet to be proven.

The Rise of China’s Customer Service Robots

It’s no more the Great Leap Forward, but instead the “Robotic Leap Forward.” Automation at the industrial level is now expanding to the consumer level in China, and Beijing is looking to use investment in customer service robots as part of its push to market the nation as a global leader in technology and innovation.

China Chips Away at Taiwan’s Semiconductor Talent Pool

The US-China trade war, combined with stringent sanctions restricting Beijing’s access to a majority of the chip market, has impaired China’s semiconductor aspirations. As a result, Chinese companies have employed various means to poach top semiconductor talent from Taiwan in order to achieve the technological self-sufficiency they seek. Experienced and skilled Taiwanese semiconductor, or integrated circuit (IC) design engineers, could be the key to Chinese chip dominance. However, it could also lead to a significant talent deficit in Taiwan’s semiconductor industry.

E-Commerce Lends a Hand to Eradicating Rural Poverty in China

In 2015, President Xi committed to eradicating rural poverty by the end of 2020, and despite the economic distress brought on by the pandemic, China declared its momentous victory. While a mix of state policy and private sector support were key to the campaign’s success, digital technologies such as e-commerce played a pivotal role in improving the quality of life in rural areas and have brought China one step closer to realizing a moderately prosperous society.

Driving to the Future: Beijing’s Bet on Autonomous Vehicles

Over the last decade, Beijing has spent billions of dollars developing AI technologies to become a global leader in autonomous vehicles. If domestic tech giants can lower the marginal cost of AVs, offer a safe and secure form of autonomous transportation, and secure full-scale adoption within the world’s largest consumer market, China will revolutionize the automotive industry and earn trillions in revenues.

The Beijing Bash: US Sanctions Drive Investment to Chinese Semiconductors

US sanctions designed to limit China’s access to cutting edge semiconductor technology have challenged Beijing’s ambition for technological hegemony. Even with significant state-backed investment over the past 30 years, China’s semiconductor industry still lacks the capabilities necessary to compete in the global marketplace. The current economic and political environment poses an ultimatum for the country: innovate or fall behind.

Encryption vs. Surveillance: How the NSL Is Changing Hong Kong’s Tech Landscape

The Hong Kong national security law created a series of provisions that restrict the flow of information and suppress the civil unrest within the region. In the short term, this new law has had a profound impact on the business landscape, creating a series of winners which seek to expand their market share in the local marketplace. In the long term, it will reform the technology landscape in Hong Kong for years to come.

AI in China: Open Sourcing and the Players Behind the Curtain

AI technology dominance is playing a larger role in China’s global ambitions. Now, Beijing and tech players alike are seeking to push the industry to the next level through AI Open Source Software – a framework that greatly influences innovation, shapes market norms, and cultivates healthy competition – making it a core component of China’s long-term AI strategy.

Closing In on ‘Cloud Nine’: China’s Cloud Computing Market Jets Forward

China’s cloud computing market, while the second largest in the world, remains a fraction of the size of its US competitor. As Beijing continues to prioritize investment in this sector, China’s tech giants will continue to propel the quickly growing domestic industry outwards into the global stratosphere.

China’s Live Streaming E-Commerce Reaches New Heights

The ‘Era of Live Streaming E-Commerce’ first blew up in 2019, creating a new industry at the intersection of e-commerce and live streaming. The pandemic has proven to be a major opportunity for this industry, both in terms of attracting new potential consumers and capturing shifting consumption habits. But one question stands: ‘Will it last?’

Investment, Incentives, & Institutions: The 3 ‘I’s Driving Chinese Fintech Innovation

China is pursuing top foreign talent and investment to strengthen its fintech industry. The industry offers easy access to capital and supportive regulation that provide substantial market potential for ambitious market entrants. Despite cultural barriers and distinct consumer preferences, foreign startups with a proper China strategy can receive many of the same incentives and opportunities for success as domestic competitors.

Scroll to Top